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4 edition of Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management found in the catalog.

Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management

Gregory J. McKee

Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management

by Gregory J. McKee

  • 161 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, Agricultural Experiment Station, North Dakota State University in Fargo, N.D .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biological invasions -- Control -- Mathematical models,
  • Greenhouse whitefly -- Control,
  • Land use -- Economic aspects,
  • Strawberries -- Diseases and pests

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGregory J. McKee.
    SeriesAgribusiness & applied economics report -- no. 583
    ContributionsNorth Dakota State University. Center for Agricultural Policy and Trade Studies., North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station (Fargo)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH353 .M33 2006
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 20 p. :
    Number of Pages20
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16652321M
    LC Control Number2007406717

    Spatial Invasive Infestation and Priority Analysis Model Effective and efficient prioritization of invasive species treatments is an ever more important aspect of land management, as the number and distribution of invasive species increase yet budgets are often decreasing. Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management. Presented at the AAEA Annual Meetings, Long Beach, CA. Osborne, L. (). Temperature-dependent development of greenhouse whitefly and its parasite. This research was supported by the Program of Research on the Economics of Invasive Species Management (PREISM.

    Modeling the Effects of an Invasive Species Use Arrange It to model how the introduction of an invasive land predator —the stoat—affected the populations of kiwi and other animals in its new habitat. Research addressing the effects of including absence data and dis­ persal constraints on model performance is needed to improve spatial predictions of biological invasions and advance ecological conceptualization of species distribution modeling. 2. Methods Target species and presence/absence data.

    Invasive species are one of the leading drivers of global environmental change, and cause large ecological and economic impacts (Olson ; Aukema et al. ).Most economic analysis of bioinvasion control frames the problem as a whole-landscape problem, as if a single decision maker has the ability to carry out actions to contain spread or eradicate (Olson ; Epanchin-Niell and Hastings. Introduction. Invasive species are notoriously difficult and expensive to control or eradicate, and it is important to try to find the most efficient management strategies (Byers et al. ).Prevention is usually more cost‐effective than post‐entry eradication or containment (Mack et al. ; Rejmanek ; Leung et al. ), but obviously it is already too late to use this option for.


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Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management by Gregory J. McKee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Modeling the Effect of Spatial Externalities on Invasive Species Management Gregory J. McKee* 1 Introduction Changes in production conditions caused by biological invasions can be complex. As a result, modeling invasive species management decisions can be difficult.

Externalities associated with spatial relationships among growers compound this difficulty. In order to create. In this paper, a bioeconomic model is used to explicitly analyze how externalities caused by spatial relationships among agricultural producers affect optimal invasive species management decisions.

BibTeX @INPROCEEDINGS{Mckee06modelingthe, author = {Gregory J. Mckee}, title = {Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management}, booktitle = {Presented at the AAEA Annual Meetings}, year = {}}.

As a result, modeling invasive species management decisions can be difficult. Modeling these decisions is further compounded by externalities associated with spatial relationships among growers.

In order to calculate optimal management decisions, an accurate bioeconomic model of the feedback between grower decisions and the new biological interactions created by an invasive species. In this paper, a bioeconomic model is used to explicitly analyse how externalities caused by spatial relationships among agricultural producers affect optimal invasive species management decisions.

The example of the coordinated greenhouse whitefly management in the Oxnard area (California california Subject Category: Geographic EntitiesCited by: 5.

BibTeX @INPROCEEDINGS{Mckee06modelingthe, author = {Gregory J. Mckee and Rachael E. Goodhue and James A. Chalfant and Colin A.

Carter}, title = {Modeling the effect of spatial externalities on invasive species management}, booktitle = {Presented at the AAEA Annual Meetings}, year = {}}.

Changes in production conditions associated with biological invasions can be complex. As a result, modeling invasive species management decisions can be difficult. Modeling these decisions is further compounded by externalities associated with.

Yet species distribution models are ideal for this type of study because they capture localised impacts (at sites) and can extend these impacts across larger spatial scales using geographic information systems.

Predicting impacts across landscapes is an extremely useful tool for invasive species, and may highlight the need for direct. Request PDF | Spatial-Dynamic Externalities and Coordination in Invasive Species Control | This paper investigates the coordination problem in transboundary species invasions.

When invasions. Many of the lessons from the existing literature on invasive species management have been derived from studies focusing more on management responses over time than across space.

In this paper, we explore the effects of using identical policies—such as those derived from single-region models—for invasive species control across two nonidentical regions, connected by economics and ecology. “Modeling the Effect of Spatial Externalities on Invasive Species Management.” Department Report #, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, North Dakota State University.

Carter, C.A., J.A. Chalfant, R.E. Goodhue, and G.J. McKee. “Economic Impact of the. Invasive pests cross property boundaries. Property managers may have private incentives to control invasive species despite not having sufficient incentive to fully internalize the external costs of their role in spreading the invasion.

Each property manager has a right to future use of his own property, but his property may abut others’ properties enabling spread of an invasive species.

Modeling Spatial Externalities: A Panel Data Approach Christian Beer and Aleksandra Riedly First draft, do not quote.

Abstract In this paper we argue that the Spatial Durbin Model (SDM) is an appropriate framework to empirically quantify di erent kinds of externalities. Besides, it. McKee, G.J. “Modeling the Effect of Spatial Externalities on Invasive Species Management.” Department Report #, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, North Dakota State University.

Carter, C.A., J.A. Chalfant, R.E. Goodhue, and G.J. McKee. “Economic Impact of. In turn, migration is influenced by the spatial configuration of patches, thus the metapopulation concept has boosted research on the effects of fragmentation on the demography of populations, leading to models that help to predict the distribution patterns and dynamics of species in real landscapes (HanskiDe Roissart et al.

The spread of invasive species is responsible for severe ecological damage and economic losses and is recognised as a significant threat to biodiversity 1, management is a challenging problem. This article examines the use of economic analysis to inform bioinvasion management, with particular focus on forest resources.

Economics is key for understanding invasion processes, impacts, and decision-making. Biological invasions are driven by and affect economic activities at multiple scales and stages of an invasion.

Bioeconomic modeling seeks to inform how resources can be. Modeling the management of spread externalities presents tradeoffs between computational tractability and realistic representations of ecological and economic characteristics that influence policy outcomes. Spatial-dynamic models of renewable resource management are.

“Modeling the Effect of Spatial Externalities on Invasive Species Management: The Greenhouse Whitefly in California-grown Strawberries.” Agricultural Systems McKee, G.J., Shaik, S., and M.

Boland. “Role of Financial Variables in. Many dispersal models ignore such interactions and while they may be interesting theoretical models, they are less useful for practical management of invasive species. The purpose of this study was to create and investigate the behaviour of a spatially explicit model that simulates insect dispersal over realistic landscapes.

The book will be a valuable resource for graduate students incorporating landscape ecology and/or species modeling in their degree programs. About the Editors C. Ashton Drew is a postdoctoral researcher in the USGS North Carolina Cooperative Fish .Modeling spatial expansion of invasive alien species: relative contributions of environmental and anthropogenic factors to the spreading of the harlequin ladybird in France Species distribution models (SDM) have often been used to predict the potential ranges of introduced species and prioritize management strategies.

However, this approach.at s to those of species j at s'. The aggregate effects associated with an agent of species i at s are Eii[s,S] = fsEYi[s,s']ds' which describes the spatial externality to an agent of species i at s from species j over S; and EiO[S,s] = SsEi0[s',s]ds' which describes the total externality from an additional agent of species i at s to species 1.